rxpharmacist

Career advancement opportunities – Residency or fellowship?

Over the last decade, the profession of pharmacy and the capabilities of a pharmacist has advanced immensely with respect to broader clinical responsibilities and logistical needs in the Pharma industry. We previously lived in a time where a bachelor’s degree in pharmacy sufficed for a career in pharmacy practice. Since 2003; however, the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) degree has superseded previous qualifications to become a licensed pharmacist and has provided pharmacists more holistic roles as a healthcare provider. To dive deeper, the role of a pharmacist now extends from the initial introduction of a chemical molecule for drug therapy all the way to managing a patient’s regimen post dispensing. Based on the competitiveness and saturation of the workforce, in addition to employment projections showing decreased future demand for retail pharmacists (as previously mentioned in our Pharmacist market saturation and career outlook blog here), it is presumed by many that a PharmD will simply be a stepping stone within the realm of pharmacy practice. Therefore, the well-rounded ability needed for our future pharmacists will strongly build through residencies and fellowship.

What are some opportunities to differentiate yourself as a newly graduate? Let’s take a look at the following main categories of post-graduate training programs:

Residencies:

  • Focus primarily on direct patient care
  • Within a clinical, hospital, or community setting
  • Collaborate with pharmacists, nurses, and other healthcare professionals
  • Duration: 1 year each – Postgraduate Year One and Two (PGY1 and PGY2)
    • PGY1 – General medicine
    • PGY2 – Specialized therapeutics
      • Specific areas of focus include: Ambulatory care, cardiology, critical care, geriatric, pediatric, oncology, pain management, and more. For a more complete list of options, be sure to check out American Society of Health-System Pharmacists’ (ASHP) website.
    • Interestingly enough, the perception of a PGY3 residency has been viewed negatively by many pharmacists. Based on a distributed survey, residents, preceptors, coordinators, and other pharmacists believe that PGY3 training offers limited benefits in professional development.
  • Career after completion: Hospital or clinical pharmacist

While clinical and hospital settings are more predominate, many also choose to pursue community-based residency programs. This path allows residents to remain within the community setting while taking on critical education and training to provide increased care and improve patient outcomes.

Another popular residency of interest is managed care. Managed care residencies heavily focus on evidence-based clinical decision-making and comparative research, medication therapy management, clinical drug evaluation, formulary management, quality assurance, and drug utilization review. A pharmacist within these roles is responsible for performing any analysis, for example, drug utilization data to identify trends and then implement new strategies to improve patient outcomes. Additionally these roles may also require on-going knowledge of all heath plan pharmacy benefits. Beyond the logistical aspects of analyses, clinical knowledge is key for a successful career in managed care. Managed care pharmacists are also part of multidisciplinary teams during rounds in which they serve as the primary drug information resource, provide pharmaceutical interventions, facilitate prior authorizations, and develop educational materials for patients and providers.

What’s the likelihood of matching?

Below is a graphical representation of the match statistics between 2013-2020. Figure 1 illustrates the amount of applicants participating in the match, positions offered, matches/positions filled, unmatched applicants, and unfilled positions. Based on the trend, it’s easy to interpret that residency is playing an expanding role as more programs are being introduced each year. While this appears to be beneficial, it’s also important to address the increasing applicant pool, making it a challenging to gain acceptance in the program of your choice.

A close up of a map

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Figure 1. Complete match statistics between 2013-2020.

Fellowships:

  • More research and data-based
  • Within the pharmaceutical industry, academia, nontraditional pharmacy or healthcare setting
  • Collaborate with professionals, both in and out of healthcare
  • Duration: Ranges between 1-3 years depending on the program
  • Career after completion: Pharmaceutical industry or academia

It is very clear that these two main options provide two distinct pathways. The direction you wish to pursue will strictly depend on your interests. If you thoroughly enjoyed classes that focused on therapeutics, pharmacology, and kinetics throughout pharmacy school then a residency may be the best option for you. Conversely, if you were more engaged on the economics, research, and administrative science side of pharmacy, then a fellowship would be better suited for you. Whether you wish to enhance your clinical knowledge or look for professional advancement, a residency or fellowship will provide a firm foundation and present you with many unique career opportunities down the road.

What can you do now and what are some additional resources to find out more?

  • Take a moment to fill out the APhA Career Pathway Evaluation Program for Pharmacy Professionals survey. This quiz will aim to assess your goals, values, strengths, likes, and dislikes.
  • Maximize your potential and showcase your academic achievements while demonstrating your leadership qualities outside of the classroom.
  • Check out the ASHP and ACCP directories to get a better idea of the many residency and fellowship opportunities out there and which institute may best suit you.

Whatever you wish to do is ultimately your decision. All we recommend from our end is to be the best version of yourself and manifest all your skills in an effort provide to the pharmacy profession.

Good luck!

Sam Tamjidi

RxPharmacist Team

References:

  1. Dang, Y. H., To-Lui, K. P. (2020). Pharmacist perceptions of and views on postgraduate year 3 training. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy, 77(18), 1488-1496. doi:10.1093/ajhp/zxaa198
  2. Doctor of Pharmacy. (n.d.). Retrieved September 19, 2020, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doctor_of_Pharmacy
  3. Goode, J. R., Owen, J. A., Bennett, M. S., & Burns, A. L. (2019). A marathon, not a sprint: Growth and evolution of community-based pharmacy residency education and training. Journal of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy, 2(4), 402-413. doi:10.1002/jac5.1140
  4. Postgraduate Education Frequently Asked Questions: Residencies and Research Fellowships. (n.d.). Retrieved September 17, 2020, from https://www.pharmacist.com/sites/default/files/files/10-417postgraduate.pdf
  5. Tips on Applying for a Residency or Fellowship. Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy. (n.d.). Retrieved September 19, 2020, from https://www.amcp.org/resource-center/group-resources/residents-fellows/tips-on-applying-residency-fellowship

Pharmacist market saturation and career outlook – An overview

One of the main obstacles that recent PharmD graduates face is the challenge of finding a job right out of school. Whether it is due to saturation or a lack of experience, the dynamic field of pharmacy appears to raise concern for many, and statistics appear to support this concern. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), which is responsible for publishing employment trends and projections, there is an estimated 3% decline in pharmacist employment between 2019 and 2029. While the career outlook of a pharmacist may vary by industry, it is quite evident that most of this decline comes from chain and independent pharmacies (Table 1).

Table 1. Employment projections for pharmacists in a retail versus non-retail setting.

Table 1 above accounts for 81% (or 259,000 of 321,700) of jobs that pharmacists have held in 2019, while the remaining 19% come from other industries that have a positive effect on the pharmaceutical workforce. A more detailed look at employment projections can be found here.

What can we take home from observing these statistics? The demand for pharmacists who work in non-retail settings, such as hospitals and ambulatory care facilities, is set to increase over the next decade as the number of jobs are expected to grow. Alternatively, all retail positions, which make up over half of all pharmacy jobs, is projected to take a significant hit and decline over the next 10 years. Why might this be the case? This branch of pharmacy is expected to expand the role of pharmacy technicians and transition to greater use of mail order and online pharmacies. For example, marketed as “a better, simpler pharmacy”, Amazon has expanded pharmacy by introducing their PillPack and in September 2020, launched its online pharmacy in India. This online service is free and allows patients to receive free delivery on their prescriptions and over-the-counter medications monthly, reducing the need to sort their meds, wait in line, or chase refills.

How could you respond and move forward?

  • Build connections: Use platforms such as LinkedIn to expand your social network and connect and communicate with those in the same profession. Reach out to your school’s alumni network as you already have a shared connection of your alma mater to start off the conversation.
  • Be comfortable with being uncomfortable: Often you may find more opportunities outside of your city or state of preference. While this may seem unfavorable to begin with, coming out of you comfort zone will always pay off.
  • Be innovative and embrace change: Demonstrate your passion for excelling the pharmacy profession and show your willingness to flourish. Opportunities will come by with the right mindset.

As always, best of luck!

Sam Tamjidi

RxPharmacist Team

References: Pharmacists: Occupational Outlook Handbook. (n.d.). Retrieved September 09, 2020, from https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/pharmacists.htm

How to pass your NAPLEX the first time

Congratulations, you made it through pharmacy school and officially graduated! Now, you may find yourself consistently browsing through articles and student forums across the web, all in hopes of finding the best tips for succeeding in your upcoming licensure exam(s). The NAPLEX has undeniably become more challenging over the years. Changes were made to the exam back in 2016, ultimately resulting in decreased pass rates since then (Table 1).

YearPassing Rate (%)
201494.9
201592.6
201685.9
Table 1. First-time NAPLEX Pass Rates for 2014-2016

With the exception of the brief increase in passing rates seen in 2018, scores remain consistently low since 2016 (Table 2). Is the exam becoming more clinical? Are school curriculums becoming outdated? Or are exam writers simply burning out due to the extended length and duration of the NAPLEX? There could be a variety of reasons as to why pass rates have dropped, and while preparing for an exam that covers up to 4 years of material may feel overwhelming, this article will pinpoint everything you need to know to overcome these statistics and take down your NAPLEX exam (also be sure to check out tips on how to pass your MPJE from our RxPharmacist blog here).

YearPassing Rate (%)
201786.28
201888.03
201986.74
Table 2. First-time NAPLEX Pass Rates for 2017-2019

  1. The first step in preparing for any exam is familiarizing yourself with it .

The NAPLEX is 6 hours long and contains 250 questions; 200 count towards your score, while the remaining 50 questions anonymously serve as experimental questions and will have no effect on your score. Many of the questions you’ll come across will be written as patient cases and will require you to piece together multiple elements of the information provided. Questions are presented in multiple choice, select all that apply, fill-in-the-blank (for calculations), ordered response, and hot-spot (using a diagram to identify the answer) format.

The NAPLEX is broken into two major areas:

  • Area 1: Ensure Safe and Effective Pharmacotherapy and Health Outcomes (67%)
  • Area 2: Safe and Accurate Preparation, Compounding, Dispensing, and Administration of Medications and Provision of Health Care Products (33%)

Each one of these areas are further broken down into more detailed subcategories that are listed as part of the NAPLEX competency statements found here from NABP’s website.

  • Once you know the basis of the exam, the next important item on your checklist is to implement a study schedule that strictly predetermines your daily and weekly goals. As much we’d like to provide an estimate on how much time you should set aside to study, the only person who is best aware of their tendencies and abilities is you. Be realistic and fair with your timeline and be sure create an effective study environment by setting aside all distractions during study periods.
  • In terms of study resources, Rxprep has become well-reputable throughout its time and many have relied on the course book as it covers each topic in depth and provides effective illustrations. Rxprep can definitely be a primary tool for studying, but not the only one.

Other helpful resources include:

  • Quizlets: Online flash cards that can serve to enhance and encourage quick recall.
  • RxPharmacist’s practice questions: One of the most updated guides that contains over 500 NAPLEX practice questions that highly mimic the actual exam.
  • Medication and disease state charts: Will help condense information down to the most important material you need to know – excellent tool to use for review. Our RxPharmacist CPJE exam guide provides a nice review of all of the major clinical topics with visuals and easy to read charts.

One thing we’d like to place emphasis on is the importance of practicing calculations. A considerable portion of the exam contains calculations, which are typically very easy to answer if you’re familiar with the formulas and procedures. Consistent practice will help make you an expert in calculations, allowing for a little more leeway when you come across the more tedious and difficult clinical questions. This is why our RxPharmacist NAPLEX guide has a heavy amount of difficult practice calculations so you can easily breeze through the calculation portion to score as high as possible in boosting your overall score.

Similar to the MPJE, the questions on the NAPLEX can be detailed and require thorough reading. Be sure not to rush through the exam and be mindful of what the question is asking.

Best of luck!

Sam Tamjidi, PharmD

RxPharmacist Team

References:

  1. Score Results. (n.d.). Retrieved August 27, 2020, from https://nabp.pharmacy/programs/naplex/score-results/
  2. Welch, A. C., & Karpen, S. C. (2018). Comparing Student Performance on the Old vs New Versions of the NAPLEX. American journal of pharmaceutical education, 82(3), 6408. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe6408

How to Pass Your MPJE Exam the First Time

Each year, the NABP composes a list of MPJE pass rates for each school and college of pharmacy in the United States and compares these results to previous years. While the goal is to observe an upward and promising trend in pass rates, the data obtained between 2017-2019 indicates otherwise, as illustrated in the figure below. Cumulative pass rates across the United States have declined from 83.98% to 81.9% over the last couple of years and while the difference may not appear significant, any outcome that does not demonstrate improvement is unfavorable and must be addressed.

Data Reference: NABP website

What could be the result for the decline in performance? Increased burnout? Increased competition? Poor pharmacy coverage of law? Regardless what the case may be, studying for the MPJE is a tedious process. You may not know what to do or where to begin; however, there are many tips and resources that may be useful to make you feel more prepared for your upcoming exam.

There are no shortcuts and a lot of time and effort must be devoted to preparing. In this article, we attempt to help you understand the highlights of the MPJE and how to pass it the first time.

Know what the exam is about.

The MPJE requires a passing score of 75% or higher. It is constructed as a 2.5-hour exam that is composed of 120 questions with three areas of focus, including:

  • Pharmacy practice (83%)
  • Licensure, registration, certification, and operational requirements (15%)
  • General regulatory requirements (3%)

The exam aims to assess an individual’s competency by testing their knowledge and skills in evaluating situations and applying relevant federal and state laws. Knowing the build-up of the exam can be a useful marker in indicating how much time should be devoted to each section. A greater breakdown of each area of focus can be found on NABP’s website here. All questions are in multiple choice, select all that apply, K-type (I only, II and III, or I, II, and III), and ranking format. Be prepared to choose the best answer(s).

Use appropriate study materials.

Unlike preparing for the NAPLEX, which is typically associated with review of one extensive guide, preparation for the MPJE is a little different in that it does not have its own “go-to” guide. RxPharmacist noticed this concern and took action by erasing the dilemma of what resource to use. Here are some tools to help you pass on your first try:

  • Both the state laws and rules can be found on your Board of Pharmacy website. We recommend going to your Board of Pharmacy website first, and if you need help, then pursue study guides as another resource.
    • If you choose to review all the content on the Board’s website, be sure to take notes while you read. The material can be quite extensive as a whole but reducing it into your own writing will serve as an excellent source when the time comes to do your final review before your exam.
  • RxPharmacist provides detailed study guides (in both online and print format) that target key points the MPJE generally focuses on. These comprehensive guides cover both federal and state pharmacy law while providing plenty of questions for practice. To see if a guide is available for your state, check out all the courses provided here.
  • Guide to Federal Pharmacy Law, 9th Edition provides an excellent review of federal law applicable to the exam. The limited use of legal jargon allows for a smoother read while focusing on the most pertinent information.

Whether you choose to study all the material from your Board of Pharmacy’s website or purchase a study guide for a smoother ride, there are a series of topics that must be focused on and highlighted, such as the following:

  • Prescription/labeling requirements
  • Controlled substances
    • DEA forms
    • Classification of controlled substances
    • Prescribing authority and filling
    • Emergency/partial fills
    • Expiration
    • Transfers
    • Refills
  • Other
    • Compounding
    • Continuing education
    • Drug utilization reviews
    • Adulterated vs. misbranded
    • LTCF/hospice facilities
    • Emergency kits
    • Immunizations

Practice, Practice, and Practice!

It’s one thing to study all the material, but it’s an entirely different element to apply all the content you learned to patient scenarios. You won’t realize how challenging it is to distinguish between multiple answer choices until you practice, and thus application is crucial. Some of the highlighted study material listed above can provide you with practice questions; however, additional resources to maximize your practice can be found on NABP’s website.

Another great way to test yourself is with the use of flash cards!

Additional tips:

  • Create a schedule and routine for yourself. Every person is different, thus being aware of your study habits is critical in allowing yourself appropriate time to prepare.
  • Remember to put aside your biased work experience and not depend on everything you see during your workdays such as in the retail pharmacy setting. Sometimes there are differences between what the law states and what your company’s policy is.
  • As the exam does not specify between state and federal law, always pick whichever law is stricter.

Keep in mind the questions on the MPJE can be detailed and require thorough reading. Be sure to not rush through the exam and be mindful of what the question is asking.

Good luck!

Sam Tamjidi, PharmD

RxPharmacist Team

References: MPJE Score Results. (n.d.). Retrieved August 27, 2020, from https://nabp.pharmacy/programs/mpje/score-results/

Creating an edge over other PharmD graduates

It has always been my top-priority goal to gain experiences that would further my personal and professional development which made this position an especially enticing one. Throughout pharmacy school, my unique experiences in diverse work settings and industries helped create a necessary edge over other Doctor of Pharmacy graduates. Although my post-doctoral fellowship was cancelled due to COVID-19, RxPharmacist allowed me to continue to have a productive summer as I developed new skills to become a more marketable Doctor of Pharmacy graduate.

My experience aligned perfectly with my growth mindset as I grew to overcome obstacles that came with completing new projects. Beyond the expected technical skills from content creation and remote communication, I was also exposed to start-up culture and entrepreneurship. My cohort was able to participate in brainstorming sessions on business and marketing strategy that management provided instant feedback on. The mentorship and network development also made it easy for my cohort to connect and support each other in their career trajectory.

Through RxPharmacist, I improved my knowledge of NYS pharmacy law, technical writing, and the test prep start-up industry. I welcome any students and graduates with questions to contact me here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joan-cheung/

-Joan Cheung

St. John’s University, 2020 PharmD Graduate

Networking, mentorship, and a preceptor that rocks!

If you are looking for a great opportunity to jump start your pharmacy career, while gaining valuable firsthand experience and mentorship from an amazing group of people, look no further! The summer graduate internship offered by RxPharmacist is a great program that I would highly encourage to any PharmD student.

When I first joined the team, I was not sure what to expect. I knew that I had a deep interest for medical writing and joining the RxPharmacist team seemed to be the perfect opportunity for post-grad. But, RxPharmacist is so much more than just writing MPJE guides. Being a summer intern afforded me the opportunity to work with amazing pharmacists and other recent graduates. The best part of the program was the mentorship and guidance that I received from my preceptor. While working and studying for your licensure exams FROM HOME, you will also be able to receive the support and guidance you need as you transition from being a student to a true professional!

I would strongly encourage any pharmacist student to consider internship opportunities with RxPharmacist. Not only would you be rewarded as you study for your licensure exams, but you would also be gaining valuable experience and insight to the world of medical writing, marketing, business strategy, and effective networking.

Nnenna I., 2020 RxPharmacist Graduate Summer Intern

Husson University, Class of 2020

Intern Testimonial- Getting a helping Hand Among COVID-19

Prior to the completion of pharmacy school there were a lot of questions as to which direction of pharmacy I wanted to pursue. With the many conflicts surrounding job saturation and COVID-19, I was quick to realize it would be in my best interest to become more open-minded towards other career opportunities. Coming across the graduate intern position at RxPharmacist started off as nothing more than curiosity, but now, after completion of the program, I can say with full confidence it was one of the best life decisions I have ever made. 

At RxPharmacist, communication and support is transparent. You work with a team that truly cares about your performance and future career. Not only do they provide constant feedback on your work, but they also create the time to communicate with you to reflect on your resume and cover letter, while assisting you in expanding your professional network. The 10-week program is more than creating a study guide, it’s an opportunity to gain additional insight and hands-on skills that focus on medical writing, entrepreneurship, and marketing. 

The development of your very own study guide will not only aid yourself in passing the MPJE on the first try, but it will also support the pharmacy profession as a whole by helping all other newly graduates succeed as well. I am extremely grateful for the opportunity I had with RxPharmacist and I highly recommend this to anyone seeking experience!

Sam T., 2020 RxPharmacist Graduate Intern

Mercer University, Class of 2020

Supporting our pharmacy profession: Team Member Testimonial

My journey with RxPharmacist started with a post on my pharmacy class’s Facebook page asking for help to contribute to their Florida MPJE guide. I reached out and volunteered to help. This experience was very valuable as it helped me develop my writing skills, work within a team with other pharmacy graduates around the State of Florida, and helped me study for the MPJE exam. After I found out I passed the MPJE, there was no way I could take another one.

Little did I know, a year later, I would be moving to Washington, DC. I was researching online for study materials for the DC MPJE, but had little luck in finding materials. That is when I came across RxPharmacist again. I reached out asking if there were any DC MPJE study materials available. Fortunately, I was presented with an opportunity to author a DC MPJE Guide with RxPharmacist. I was already working as a pharmacist and my job was very demanding; however, the RxPharmacist team was very flexible with allowing me to write the guide at my own pace within the time frame requested. This opportunity closely aligned with my goals to help the pharmacy profession and improve my writing skills. Thank you RxPharmacist for another great experience! Best of luck to all current and future pharmacists on your MPJE exams!

Chrissy T., Pharm.D., 2020 Medical Writing Associate

University of Florida College of Pharmacy, Class of 2019

What is the MPJE and What do I Need to Know?

WHAT IS THE MPJE?

The Multi-Prudence Jurisdiction Examination (MPJE) is a 120-question computer-based exam that uses adaptive testing response questions. For example, if you keep getting questions wrong then the computer will provide you questions that are statistically deemed “easier.”  It’s important to note that of the 120 questions on this exam, only 100 are used to calculate your final score. The remaining 20 questions are pretest questions that will not count into your MPJE score, but you won’t be able to tell which ones are pretest questions and which ones are not. The total testing time is two hours with NO breaks during the testing session so it’s important to take note of time. 

WHAT IS THE PASSING SCORE?

The passing scaled score is 75 with the minimum score being zero and maximum 100. The exam is divided into three major sections:

  • Pharmacy Practice- 83%
  • Licensure, registration, certification, operational requirements- 15%
  • General Regulatory Processes- 2%

WHAT HAPPENS IF I FAIL?

If you don’t pass the first time you still have 4 more attempts to pass you’re MPJE exam. A maximum of 5 tries per state to pass the MPJE is allowed. Hopefully you won’t fail the first time you take your MPJE but if you do, you need to wait 30 days per state until you can sit for the exam again to re-take. For the NAPLEX, it is a period of 45 days to wait before you can retake the exam again. 

Note that if your eligibility to sit for the NAPLEX or MPJE is going to expire within 10 business days then you won’t be able to pay and sit for the exam so make sure as soon as you get your authorization to test (ATT) letter that you book your appointment as soon as possible. 

IMPORTANT 2019-2020 UPDATES TO MPJE AND NAPLEX

The re-sit fees for the NAPLEX and MPJE are bumped up to $475 and $150 (YIKES that hurts!). If you miss your exam due to an emergency (whatever that means), then you can ask if you can re-sit to take your exam for a reduced fee of $170 for the NAPLEX or $100 for the MPJE. 

SOME MAJOR POINTS TO REMEMBER:

  • All questions are answered in order so there’s no going back
  • Lots of situational questions
  • Online registration costs $250.00 per examination
  • You will need to bring two forms of ID at Pearson Vue
  • At least one picture ID with signature (i.e. Driver’s License)
  • Other can be credit card with signature
  • 120 questions, 100 count towards your score
  • MUST complete 107 questions for examination to be scored
  • If you fail, you must wait 30 days to retake for the MPJE and 45 days for the NAPLEX
  • The MPJE doesn’t distinguish between state and federal laws, but answer each question based on state law
  • Any misconduct or inkling of misconduct is grounds for failure
  • Arrive at least 30 minutes early
  • Ensure to read EVERY SINGLE WORD!
    • They will try to trick you so make sure to answer the question they ask, and lookout for unusual words as triggers. 

BREAKDOWN OF FEES:

Total if you passed the first time: 

$250 MPJE ($150 + $100 application fee)

$575 NAPLEX ($475 + $100 application fee)

$825

Total if you failed but passed the second time: 

$500 MPJE ($250 x 2)

$1,150 NAPLEX ($575 x 2)

$1,650

As you can see, it really adds up if you don’t pass the first time so we hope that you pass the first time! This does not include the stress and wasted time either since you can’t start working until your licensed. We highly recommend reviewing the https://nabp.pharmacy/programs/mpje/ site and reading over the NAPLEX/MPJE registration bulletin. They provide a more specific overview of the exam, scheduling requirements, and a list of core competencies for you to understand. Don’t spend too much time on the core competencies, but more on understanding the laws, as there are many situational type questions.

About RxPharmacist 

RxPharmacist got created out of a calling to help a fellow classmate who failed his board exams, lost his job offer, and almost went homeless in not being able to gain employment as he had to wait 45 days before being able to sit and retake his board exams. Frustrated over the high cost of expensive study guides that were outdated, heavy in content, and weren’t focused on getting to the information needed to pass was the call to action that RxPharmacist has answered.

We are a group of volunteer pharmacists, paid pharmacy students, and mentors to our pharmacy profession driven by fellow pharmacy graduates and pharmacists just like you. We want to make a positive difference and disrupt the pharmacy test-prep industry but we need your help.

If you think you can help join our cause, feel free to shoot us over an email on how we can improve our services and products to help you. Even though this starter guide is basic in nature, we hope it can get you pointed in the right direction so you can start your journey in passing your MPJE board exams. Whether you are a fresh pharmacy graduate or a seasoned pharmacist getting licensed in another state, we’re excited you started your journey with us although it will be short-lived as we hope you will pass the first time! 

We all understand board studying for gaining your pharmacist licensure is not easy. We don’t want the stress and headaches of potential failing you’re MPJE get in the way of the career you want.

More than just a study guide…

When I graduated from pharmacy school just a few short months ago, I found myself in the same predicament that most other students find themselves in … what do I do now? I have my degree, I have a year’s worth of rotation experience, but I still have to pass my licensing exams and find a job. I applied to RxPharmacist and was given the opportunity to write the Maryland MPJE Guide. 

When I applied to be an intern for RxPharmacist, I knew that I would be writing a study guide, but I had no idea that I would receive so many other benefits. RxPharmacist thrives off of a spirit of mentorship and connection. I was able to get personalized career advice, resume and CV reviews, and the contact information of other pharmacists who could help me to achieve my goals. The individuals who I have had the pleasure to connect with during my internship truly do give back to the pharmacy profession by assisting new graduates in any way that they can. This experience has really inspired me to give back, as well, since I know what it’s like to be a struggling new pharmacy graduate with many questions, but not so many answers. 

Now that I am at the end of my official internship, I can say with confidence that this experience has provided me with invaluable skills for my future in pharmacy. I am proud to have produced an MPJE guide to help other Maryland graduates like myself to pass their exams on the first try. Furthermore, it has been amazing to have one-on-one career guidance, constructive feedback, and pharmacy advice in a safe space with a trusted pharmacist. I am extremely grateful to have been selected to continue RxPharmacist’s mission of giving back to the profession.

Best of luck to all the new pharmacy graduates!

Lauren A., Pharm.D., 2019 RxPharmacist Intern

Shenandoah University, Class of 2019

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